Happy Holidays!


So I’m gonna be politically correct this year πŸ™‚

Happy holidays everyone!21-happy-holidays5

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The End of an Era


Today is the 11th day of the 12th month of the 13th year in the millennium and at 14:15 and 16 seconds this afternoon the date and time will briefly read: 11/12/13 14:15.16.

11/12/13 is the last date this century with three consecutive numbers – the next for the UK will be February 1, 2103.

Dubbed ‘noughts and crosses day’ by Ron Gordon, a retired teacher from California who hasΒ launched a competitionΒ to devise an interesting way to celebrate the day, 11/12/13 is one of a number (no pun intended) of numerical anomalies known as ‘sequential days’.

Sequential days are extremely rare and there are usually a mere handful of them a century – in the UK we won’t see one for another ninety years, though in the US (where they write dates the wrong way around) the last one for nearly a century will occur on the 13th of December next year: i.e. 12/13/14.

Another numerical anomaly are the so-called ‘Odd Days’. There are only six of these days a century and they occur when every number in the date is an odd number. The last such date occurred last month on the 9th of November – or 09/11/13.

Mr Gordon also coined the term ‘Trumpet Day’ to describe the date on the second day of the second month in the twenty-second year i.e: 02/02/22.

We’ll next celebrate trumpet day in 2022 (if people still care about these things). Another trumpet day could occur in the US (where as previously discussed they write the date wrongly) on the 22nd of February 2022 i.e. 2/22/22 – which in the UK will correctly read 22/02/22.

There’s also Square Root Day – 4/4/16 (the last one was on March 3, 2009) and the ‘Ones Upon A Day’ 01/11/11.

All given their names and celebrated by – you guessed it – Ron Gordon.

Useless Information About Ants


The total weight of all the ants on Earth is about the same as the weight of all the humans on Earth.

Unless you leave food out and attract them, humans rarely have a need to think about ants. They’re tiny, not poisonous and not particularly terrifying, like say, spiders. However, they far outnumber humans on earth–by one million to one!

Funnily enough, they are also roughly a millionth of a human in size too. Do the math–the total weight of all the ants on earth matches the total weight of the entire human population.

There are 10,000 different types of ants and they’ve been around for a long time. Ancient ants have been discovered in fossilised sap from 100 million years ago!

Over time, ants have changed very little. Their way of life and survival is successful. Some scientists attribute this to their unselfish ways. Ants live in colonies and bring their prey back to their many relatives to share.

(Source)